Skip to main content

Judicial Office Profile: Joshua Marks

|News

What is your job title, and can you give a brief description of your role?
I work as Deputy Private Secretary to the President of the Queen’s Bench Division (PQBD). The PQBD is one of the heads of the three High Court divisions – along with the President of the Family Division and the Chancellor of the High Court. My work is to

Joshua Marks

Joshua Marks

support a private secretary as part of a small office which assists and provides advice to the PQBD in fulfilling her leadership functions as a member of the senior judiciary and in the running of the Queen’s Bench Division.

Can you give us a snapshot of an average day?
Days in the private office are extremely varied. Sometimes we work with other teams in the Judicial Office to provide advice on recruitment and appointment of judges. At other times, we might be asked to draft briefing notes for meetings, or to work with other private offices to discuss the best ways for the heads of the three High Court divisions to allocate work to their judges. Things can change quite quickly, and we have to be able to adapt to that.

Why do you enjoy working for the Judicial Office?
The Judicial Office really is a unique part of the civil service. I really like the fact that the support we provide to senior judges helps them to maintain confidence in the rule of law, something that has considerable impact for people.

What has been your best experience since working here?
I was quite fortunate to spend a short time on a small team that was working to support the senior judiciary at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. It was really energising being around so many highly motivated people at that time, and it was a good way of channelling my worries about the pandemic into something productive.

What would you say to someone thinking of applying for a role in the Judicial Office?
It is a fascinating place where people come from different backgrounds and are all highly valued. You also learn new things here every day.

Related links

Sign up for alerts

Archives

All speeches and media releases prior to 2012 are available in The National Archives

Speeches archive

Media releases archive

Speeches

Speeches published on this website are personal views and do not necessarily reflect those of the judiciary as a whole.